Sunday, November 19, 2006

Greater Cleveland Immigrant Support Network: Greater Cleveland Immigrant Support Network

Greater Cleveland Immigrant Support Network: Greater Cleveland Immigrant Support Network


Español

Farm Labor Organizing Committee FLOC ON IMMIGRATION REFORM
http://www.floc.com/immigrantrights.html

(PDF document, English/Español)

Join the Immigrant Rights Network

(PDF document, English/Español)

ACTION ALERT !

Legislation Update

(PDF document, English)

Immigration News:

FLOC Proposes Freedom Visa

(PDF document, English/Español)

Voices from the New Civil Rights Movement

(Word document, English)

Congressman Gilmore Recognizes HR 4437 Is Wrong Bill

(opens in new window)

Baldemar Velasquez leads action at the office of Congressman Gilmore

(video clip, opens in new window)

FLOC Leads Protest

(opens in new window)

Ohio Immigrants Protest Hateful Legislation

(opens in new window)






Online Materials:

What Is the Immigrant Rights Movement?

(PDF English/Español)

Why Are They Here?

(PDF English/Español)

How Do Immigrants Contribute To Our Society?

(PDF English/Español)

Immigrant Working Rights

(PDF English/Español)

Anti-Immigrant Hate

(PDF English/Español)

What Is "Illegal"?

(PDF English)

History of Immigrant Workers

(PDF English)

What does International Law have to say about worker organizing?

* ILO Standards and the United States

* Convention 135

* Convention 98

Immigrant Rights Coalitions:

* National Coalition

(PDF English)

* US Immigrant Manifesto

(PDF English/Español)

* International Immigrant Manifesto

(PDF English/Español/François)




THE IMMIGRATION ISSUE

In recent years, we have seen a visible increase in new immigrants in the U.S. There have traditionally been immigrant neighborhoods in most large cities across America, including Irish, Germans, Italians, and also African Americans and Appalachians who have moved to new areas in the country. After World War II, suburbs began developing around the country, and many ethnic neighborhoods melted away. Until recently, immigration ceased to be a visible issue. In the 1990s, however, a new wave of immigrants became visible, as economic globalization, new social conficts, and other forces after the end of the Cold War increased the rates of migration all over the world. Hispanics are the largest and most visible of these new immigrants in the U.S., but people have come from every region in the world seeking to support their families and to realize new opportunities.

Popular reactions to these new immigrants have also been emerging in recent years. Some responses have been positive, as new neighbors have been welcomed into jobs and communities. But there have also been negative reactions, particularly after the attacks of September 11 2001. After the Civil Rights Movement, it was no longer acceptable in America to express hate and racism... but now it seems OK to be hateful and racist against immigrants. Myths and misinformation are clouding understandings, the voices of prejudice and discrimination are becoming louder, and anti-immigrants are forming vigilante groups and pushing policies that are punitive and oppressive.

What is the Real Immigration Issue?

The American society is facing a major challenge: What kind of society we are making for ourselves? Are we to become a hateful and oppressive society? Or will we become the best that we can be as a people?

FLOC has stood for social and economic justice since its beginnings. Our members are largely immigrants making important contributions in producing foods for Americans. In recent worker conventions, they have raised the issue of the prejudice and discrimination directed against them, and have called on the union to defend immigrant rights.

In response, FLOC has developed our immigrant rights campaign, with the primary goals of:

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Organizing the immigrant community to have their own voice in all areas of their lives.
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Organizing support networks for immigrant rights.
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Policy advocacy to achieve:
o The free flow of workers between countries having trade agreements.
o Legal residency for immigrants permanently working and living in the country.
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Reunification of families separated by international borders.
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Full human, civil, due process, and working rights for all immigrants.
o An ongoing process for addressing these issues with future migrant flows.

The information provided here is to help develop our supporters and allies to:

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Gain a better understanding of immigration and the challenges faced by both immigrants and our society.
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Explore what solutions can work the best for all concerned.